2010-08-22 - Cardinal Newman

                                                        CARDINAL NEWMAN
This month, in place of Father Rutler’s column, we will be running excerpts from some of Cardinal Newman’s writings, so that more people will have access to this great soul and theological genius. As Cardinal Newman never studied without praying, so should this study of Cardinal Newman be accompanied by prayers for his swift canonization and, as we hope will be the case, his designation as a Doctor of the Church.
 
                                                   From The Idea of a University:
Clad in his sacerdotal vestments, [the priest] sinks what is individual in himself altogether, and is but the rep­resentative of Him from whom he derives his com­mis­sion. His words, his tones, his actions, his presence, lose their personality; one bishop, one priest, is like another; they all chant the same notes, and observe the same genuflections, as they give one peace and one blessing, as they offer one and the same sacrifice. The Mass must not be said without a Missal under the priest’s eye; nor in any language but that in which it has come down to us from the early hierarchs of the Western Church. But, when it is over, and the celebrant has resigned the vestments proper to it, then he resumes himself, and comes to us in the gifts and associations which attach to his person. He knows his sheep, and they know him; and it is this direct bearing of the teacher on the taught, of his mind upon their minds, and the mutual sympathy which exists between them, which is his strength and influence when he addresses them. They hang upon his lips as they cannot hang upon the pages of his book.
 
From Parochial and Plain Sermons:
God beholds thee individually, whoever thou art. He “calls thee by thy name.” He sees thee, and understands thee, as He made thee. He knows what is in thee, all thy own peculiar feelings and thoughts, thy dispositions and likings, thy strength and thy weakness. He views thee in thy day of rejoicing, and thy day of sorrow. He sym­pa­thises in thy hopes and thy temptations. He interests Himself in all thy anxieties and remembrances, all the ris­ings and fallings of thy spirit. He has numbered the very hairs of thy head and the cubits of thy stature. He com­passes thee round and bears thee in his arms; He takes thee up and sets thee down. He notes thy very counten­ance, whether smiling or in tears, whether healthful or sick­­­­­­ly. He looks tenderly upon thy hands and thy feet; He hears thy voice, the beating of thy heart, and thy very breathing. Thou dost not love thyself better than He loves thee. Thou canst not shrink from pain more than He dis­likes thy bearing it; and if He puts it on thee, it is as thou would put it on thyself, if thou art wise, for a greater good afterwards.
 
A Prayer for a Visit to the Blessed Sacrament:
I place myself in the presence of Him, in whose Incarnate Presence I am before I place myself there. I adore Thee, O my Saviour, present here as God and man, in soul and body, in true flesh and blood. I acknowledge and confess that I kneel before that Sacred Humanity, which was conceived in Mary’s womb, and lay in Mary’s bosom; which grew up to man’s estate, and by the Sea of Galilee called the Twelve, wrought miracles, and spoke words of wisdom and peace; which in due season hung on the cross, lay in the tomb, rose from the dead, and now reigns in heaven. I praise, and bless, and give myself wholly to Him, who is the true Bread of my soul, and my everlasting joy.

Fr. George Rutler

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